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Thru Walkers 2015

A team for THE LEBANON MOUNTAIN TRAIL

  • $5,318
    Raised
  • 83
    Donors
  • 7
    Fundraisers

This campaign already ended. We hope you like the results!

$5,318 raised of $8,000
($4,355 online, $963 offline)

"Thru Walkers 2015" a team to help the THE LEBANON MOUNTAIN TRAIL raise funds for Cultural and Archaeological Heritage

Leaderboard

name dollars donors

1

Mary-Angela Willis

Mary-Angela's 470k Hike for Lebanon's Cultural & Heritage Sites

$1,480 17

2

Laurent Courcoul

Laurent Courcoul

$1,060 29

3

Desmond Astley-Cooper

Desmond A Cooper

$955 13

4

Souad Sbaiti

Souad Sbaiti

$790 16

5

Dima Saade

Dima Saade

$533 9

6

Sami Mitri

Sami Mitri

$500 2

7

Mustapha Kandil

Mustapha Kandil

$0 0

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Lebanon Mountain Trail Thru-Walkers 2015

A team hiking the 470 km trail to help the Lebanon Mountain Trail Association (LMTA) raise funds for its Cultural and Archaeological Heritage project

On the LMT, many cultural and heritage sites are degrading and slowly disappearing either by neglect or by lack of funds. They urgently need attention and conservation!

During the Thru Walk we’re shedding the light on 4 of them.

1-THE AFQA ROMAN TEMPLE COMPLEX- Mount Lebanon

One of the most important religious sanctuaries lying above Jbeil (Byblos) with strong religious significance to the inhabitants of the city of Byblos. The temple was constructed in honor to Achtarout (Venus), the Goddess of Beauty and lover of Adonis, the God of Desire and Beauty. Above the temple lies the Grotto of Afqa, a cliff of 200 meters (660 feet) where the waters of the sacred river Adonis, known as Nahr Ibrahim, emerge. The temple was partially destroyed in 523 A.D. by the emperor Constantine the Great due to its pagan significance. As a result, the temple of Achtarout/Venus was transformed into a Christian church.

2- THE EMIRS CHEHAB CITADEL OF HASBAYA- South of Lebanon

The citadel/ palace has a rich history that goes back to the Roman times, if not earlier. There is evidence of a previous Roman temple of which no remains are visible other than foundation base blocks. Excavations might reveal more. The present status goes back to the late 12th c. from the Crusaders period, where a military watch tower/citadel was built to survey the area. After the conquest of the region by the Emirs Chehab in 1173, the square tower was fortified around the so-called Crusader fort, which was transformed into a big palace similar to Italian palaces and citadels of the Renaissance. A mosque was built in the 13th century at the beginning of the Mamluq period.

3- THE CHURCH OF SARKIS AND BAKHOUS IN QOBAYET- North of Lebanon

The church of Sarkis and Bakhous was built in honor of 2 saints (Sergius and Bacchus), who became martyrs beginning of the 4th c. A.D. The Saints were officers in the Roman army in Syria. Their Christian faith was revealed when asked to attend to sacrifices to the God Zeus. They were ultimately tortured to death by the Romans in 303 A.D. As a result, there are many churches around the Middle East dedicated to their martyrdom. The church is said to date to the 5th-7th c. A.D. according to local present day historians. Further archaeological scientific research is needed on site.

4- THE HADRIAN INSCRIPTION OF TANNOURINE- North of Lebanon

The Roman inscription carved into the rock depicts the region’s historic character. A decree imposed by the Roman Emperor Hadrian (117 to 138) forbids its citizens to cut down namely juniper, oak, cedar and pine trees and reminds the indigenous of the right of the emperor on these forests. Many other Hadrian inscriptions can be found on the Mount Lebanon chain between 270 m and 2,360 m altitude with different epigraphic ratings, numbers and formulas depending on the rock they are carved into and the vegetation and region where they are.

During the April Thru-Walk, the LMTA is organizing cultural stops at each of the sites to shed the light on their importance. Cleaning activities by hikers, volunteers and local communities are scheduled.

With your contribution the LMTA will be able to:

- Develop and install informative panels on two sites;

- Hire an expert (archaeologist/ historian) to guide the process and conduct a preliminary assessment of the sites, and a topographer to help with the development of two site maps;

- Contribute to the cleaning activities on three sites.

Team Captain

Joseph Karam Joseph Karam